How to get simple and efficient lighting effects in babylon

Because my need is to light an interior house, just by virtue of four lights does not work. And I think the light intensity is different after importing into sandbox from outside, I would like to ask if there is any way to help me light better?

Why not exporting lightmaps from your 3s creation tools ?

@Vinc3r does wonders with those :slight_smile:

Yep you should use lightmaps. Here a tutorial using StandardMaterial, but the workflow is basically the same in PBR (hem, one day I will take time to continue writing my next Blender to BJS - PBR workflow tutorial :sweat_smile:).
You also have a tiny playground using glb import + lightmap assignation available here: https://playground.babylonjs.com/#ADPQFC#9

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Wow, the lighting of this scene is baked very soft
First of all, I would like to ask if it was baked with Blender?
Secondly, how should I handle the lighting of the movable models if I still have movable things?
Finally, I don’t know how to add the baked lighting to the sandbox, but what I’m doing is adding the lighting directly to the albedo texture… I don’t think this is a very good way. I hope you can answer this question, thanks :slight_smile:

  1. Baked in Blender Cycle using BakeTool addon, process is shown on my tutorial.

  2. Movable objets can’t have their lightings baked, obviously. However, a tiny trick to add static shadows (bringing some contrast on the object) is to have an ambient occlusion map on it (could be stored in red channel of an ORM map [Occlusion, Roughness, Metallic] in a PBR workflow).

  3. What you’re talking about here is named a complete map (color + lighting combined). Could be useful sometimes but limits a lot graphics tweaks. I never used the sandbox to add lightmaps on my objects, but basically you just have to select the materials you want, add a lightmap texture file, and set useLightmapAsShadowmap as true